On Taiwan tour, students and professors visit Chinese military academies

The Norwich delegation in a group picture with faculty and staff at Fu Hsing Kang University in Taiwan.

The Norwich delegation in a group picture with faculty and staff at Fu Hsing Kang University in Taiwan.

I am a sophomore in the Corp of Cadets with the rank of c/Corporal. I am double majoring in International Studies and Chinese (Mandarin) language, the president of Norwich’s Chinese Cultural and Language Club, and a member of the Norwich football team. This past spring break I was selected, following an application process, to represent Norwich University as a part of a Norwich International Center sponsored student delegation that traveled to two military academies on the island of Taiwan, located 110 east of mainland China. The delegation was led and organized by a three-person committee which included Dr. Joseph Byrne, associate vice president for academic affairs, Dr. Alex Chung, assistant professor of economics and finance, and Mindy Ward, the senior coordinator for international student & scholar services of Norwich’s International Center.

The committee had a very selective application process that only chose four students; after applying in November, only 10 students out of roughly 34 applicants were invited for an interview a month later. During finals week, the student delegates were informed of their acceptance. Besides myself, the others chosen were senior Peter Carbone; junior Mickey Walbridge; and sophomore Lauren Lohmiller. [Read more…]

Norwich junior joins with professor to advance cross-cultural learning for ROTC

Junior Cameron Myette, left, is working with Prof. Travis Morris to expand the understanding of foreign cultures in the ROTC program.

Junior Cameron Myette, left, is working with Prof. Travis Morris to expand the understanding of foreign cultures in the ROTC program.    Photo by Evan Bowley

Cameron Myette is a junior who will be graduating this spring, unlike most of his peers in his class. Over the last few months, with the help from faculty, he has set out to accomplish a rather large goal that would not only help the school, but other students, as a way of giving back to Norwich.

As an Army ROTC cadet, with the 100-year celebration of ROTC’s birthday just around the corner, he wondered where the future lies for the program. Myette wanted to know where ROTC has been and where it is going.

In collaboration with Prof. Travis Morris, they have set out to not only change ROTC for the better, but to help junior officers have a better understanding of cross-cultural competencies as well. [Read more…]

The time-honored junior ring tradition has roots going back to 1937

The year is 1973, a Norwich cadet is a junior and is going to be getting something he had been waiting two-and-a-half years for.

April was right around the corner and it couldn’t come any slower. He had been a part of a committee that worked on it all of sophomore year.

Michael Kelly, an associate professor of civil engineering, received his Norwich class ring that year on the annual junior ring weekend.

Kelley described his class ring in 1973, noting it showed peace with doves, knowledge, Jackman Hall, and the clock with hands that were set to 3 o’clock because that was when their parents had to leave on the day they dropped them off.

“The screaming and shouting started,” said Kelley.

“We never officially got recognized so we didn’t put the month and the date like they (students) do now,” said Kelley. “The ring also had bars at the bottom which represented each semester so there were four bars on each side.” It also had the class year on it.

“We worked on the design during the sophomore year and finished it up in the fall,” said Kelley. “Then everyone found out about them and placed their order.” [Read more…]

ROTC centennial anniversary symposium begins April 21 at Norwich

This photo from the Norwich University archives shows army cadets at commencement ceremonies in 1918. ROTC was founded at Norwich University 100 years ago, a remarkable legacy for this private military school  in the hills of northern Vermont. A three day commemoration and symposium on the impact of ROTC will be held beginning Thursday April 21 with a proclamation in the Vermont State House, and a keynote speech by General Mark Milley, chief of staff of the US Army. The Guidon will publish a special commemorative issue to mark the occasion and report on it.

This photo from the Norwich University archives shows army cadets at commencement ceremonies in 1918. ROTC was founded at Norwich University 100 years ago, a remarkable legacy for this private military school in the hills of northern Vermont. A three day commemoration and symposium on the impact of ROTC will be held beginning Thursday April 21 with a proclamation in the Vermont State House and a keynote speech by General Mark Milley, chief of staff of the US Army. The Guidon will publish a special commemorative issue to mark the occasion and report on it.

Longtime Norwich Spanish professor Joseph “Jose” Miana has passed away

From President Richard Schneider:
It is with great sadness that I inform you of the death of former longtime professor Joseph “Jose” Miana. Prof. Miana began teaching Spanish at Norwich in 2000 and dedicated over 14 years of service to the university. He retired in December 2015. Known for his impeccable dress and passion for teaching, Prof. Miana was beloved by Norwich students, as demonstrated in a March 2014 Guidon article that profiles him. On behalf of the Norwich community, I offer my condolences to Jose’s family and friends.
Calling hours will be held Wednesday, April 6, from 7 – 9 p.m. at the Pruneau-Polli Funeral Home, 58 Summer Street, Barre, VT 05641. A funeral service will be held on Thursday, April 7, at 11 a.m. at St. Monica Church, 79 Summer Street, Barre, VT.
An obituary for Prof. Miana is forthcoming and will be made available in the Times Argus newspaper.
Click on the link for the story on Professor Miana.
http://thenorwichguidon.org/?s=miana

Proposal would open ROTC courses to civilian participation by the fall of 2017

Col. Andy Hird says letting civilians with a focus on leadership take ROTC courses will broaden viewpoints in the classroom and benefit those on the military track.

Col. Andy Hird says letting civilians with a focus on leadership take ROTC courses will broaden viewpoints in the classroom and benefit those on the military track. Photo by Amber Reichart

(Second in a series on ROTC)

Course registration might have a few different options available for civilian students in the near future. Declared leadership studies minors and concentrations, take note.

“There is value in diverse thought,” said Col. Andy Hird, professor of aerospace science at Norwich University and the school’s Air Force ROTC Detachment commander. “We as a military are beholden to civilian leadership, and we as a military have recognized the divide that has grown every decade between the civilian and military population in the defense of the country.”

How can Norwich help bridge that divide? By allowing future military officers and civilian leaders to begin to partner up now in the military classroom.

There are a number of changes being proposed in the lineup to the ROTC curriculum and how it interacts with the students of Norwich. A key one is having civilian students enrolled in ROTC courses along with their cadet counterparts effective fall of 2017.

The idea is well liked by the three professors of ROTC. Echoing each others words, the sentiment was there would be nothing but value-added by taking on civilian enrollment in the military classrooms. This is predicated on space available, explained Col. Eric Brigham, the Professor of Military Science and Dean of the National College of Services.

“If it’s a free elective, if [students] are getting credit for it, if there is space for them, and if they want to take a 300 level class, I am certainly willing to open that up,” said Col. Brigham. [Read more…]

Long-standing exception allowing Norwich ROTC nursing students to be civilians may end

Tara Lyons (left) and Clara Leister, both civilians, will be commissioning as Army nurses in May. They oppose a proposed ROTC change that would bar that in the future. Bailey Beltramo photo

Tara Lyons (left) and Clara Leister, both civilians, will be commissioning as Army nurses in May. They oppose a proposed ROTC change that would bar that in the future.
Bailey Beltramo photo

(Third in a series on ROTC)

Clara Leister will be commissioning into active duty service as an Army nurse this May.

Though Leister, 21, from Hartland, Vt., may be wearing scrubs during her service time more often than her combat uniform, she has proved she not only meets the Army standard but far exceeds it since transferring to Norwich at the start of her sophomore year.

She has rappelled off mountain tops and performed competently at the Army’s Mountain Warfare School. She rucked, swam, shot, and ran her way to earn the German Armed Forces Proficiency Badge. And she has attended every summer military training opportunity afforded to her, including the Cadet Leader Course (CLC), and the Nurse Summer Training Program (NSTP).

However, what she has not done is elect to wear the uniform of a cadet while pursuing her commission. In the future if proposed changes are adopted, that will no longer be possible. [Read more…]

Norwich students praise Coaching for Leadership program

Junior Noah Clemmer participates in an ethical decision-making exercise during the Coaching for Leadership program. Photo by Mark Collier

Junior Noah Clemmer participates in an ethical decision-making exercise during the Coaching for Leadership program. Photo by Mark Collier

On Saturday, March 5th, Norwich University held its annual Coaching for Leadership Program (CLP). According to the university’s website, the purpose of the CLP is to help students “build self-awareness and prepare for real-world careers in the public and private sectors”.

Students from both the civilian side and the Corps of Cadets participated in the day-long event. Similar to results from years past, both students and alumni mentors felt that the CLP was a success.

“The whole event was something that I am definitely going to propose to my superiors when I get back home,” said Nikola Manev, a study-abroad student from Macedonia who participated in the CLP. [Read more…]

Norwich club hockey team is now undefeated two years running

With an overall record of 41-7-1 the last three years, the Norwich men’s club ice hockey team has gone undefeated in its conference for the second year in a row. The club program, for the last three straight years, has won both the regular season and conference championships.

Finishing this season with a record of 18-0-0, there is no question that Norwich’s club hockey team has built a legitimate name for the program since the team was first put together in 2009.

The team’s secret to success lies within the strong bond between the players, according to head coach Bruce Baroffio Jr. With only three civilian students on the team, the tight bond that is built between all the players in the Corps of Cadets has shown to carry over on the ice.

Baroffio has been the head coach for the last three seasons. Barrofio was the assistant coach for the two years prior to being named the head coach. He credits bringing new structure to the program for the success. “Since implementing a systems approach for the team style of play, we have seen drastic improvements to the team’s success,” said Baroffio. [Read more…]

Big Man On Campus: Mike Hogervorst of Holland easily towers over fellow students

At 6 feet, 11 inches, Mike Hogervorst, #34, towers over everyone else on the court. He's the tallest guy on campus.

At 6 feet, 11 inches, Mike Hogervorst, #34, towers over everyone else on the court. He’s the tallest guy on campus. Photo by Mark Collier.

Mike Hogervorst stands at a towering six feet and 11 inches and wears a size 15 shoe. He’s from the Netherlands and he’s currently attending Norwich and plays basketball on the Norwich men’s team.

Hogervorst’s daily schedule isn’t much different from any other Norwich student. He attends classes and attempts to sneak in a nap or two, but unlike other students Hogervorst ducks his head under an occasional doorway or two and sleeps on a bed that happens to be shorter than he is.

Hogervorst, a 20-year-old sophomore majoring in electrical engineering, is clearly the tallest student on campus. That helps when it comes to basketball. He plays center position on the Norwich University team and has scored over 300 points during the season and pulled down, not surprisingly, 132 rebounds – the most on the team. [Read more…]