Winter break cut short for basketball team

In the three weeks that the Norwich men’s basketball team has to return to campus early, four days will be spent in Florida participating in a tournament and bringing in the New Year. The rest of the time will be spent cloistered on campus, practicing for up to four hours a day, scrounging to find meals and entertainment.

It’s part of the sacrifice basketball players make to train and improve their skills while others are kicking back on holiday break.

The men’s basketball team will arrive back on campus on Dec. 27, in preparation for their flight to Florida on Dec. 28, said Richard Giroux, 21, a point guard from Colchester, Vt., who is a senior and criminal justice major.

While in Florida, they will participate in the Land of Magic Tournament. The tournament will entail two games, one against Wilkes University from Wilkes-Barre, Pa, and the other against Colby-Sawyer College from New London, N.H.

The last day of final exams for the fall semester is Dec. 19. Classes for the spring semester are set to begin on Jan. 22. Students are able to return back to campus as early as Jan. 20 but the men’s team has a decidedly shorter time away this year.

“It is exciting to come back from break early this year,” said Ryan Booth, 21, who plays forward and is a senior physical education major from Northfield, Vt.. “We get to travel to Florida and it is the team’s first time out of New England since I have been on the team.”

In previous winter breaks, the team has “practiced for roughly a week before playing a game,” said Joseph Bertrand, 21, another forward who is a senior and majors in physical education from Saugus, Mass. In the past, the team also partook in “two, two-hour practices per day” in that week before games are played.

The team will return to campus on Jan. 2, 2018 after completion of the Florida tournament. The athletes will remain on campus and will begin their traditional winter break routine. The goal is to get ready for an intense schedule in the new year.

“Once we arrive back in Vermont, we will practice for a few days before beginning a streak of six games,” said Giroux. “Between playing six games in 14 days and fitting practices inbetween the games, there is little free time left over the break.”

Each player spends their free time differently. Players partake in a wide variety of pastimes, for example “sleeping, spending extra time practicing, lifting, playing video games, or just hanging out with each other,” Bertrand said.

“One of my favorite things to do when we are not practicing or playing over the break is to get to know some of the freshman players on a more personal level,” Booth said. “Since we are always so busy with school or practice, it makes it challenging to really interact with the freshmen.”

The Cadets will host three of the games at home and be on the road for the other three. According to a few of the men’s players, it is best to play away games during winter break because there are “no classes and no worries about academic obligations.”

Basketball is one of the few athletic teams that are in season for both academic semesters, as they begin games in October and continue through the middle of February. Because of this, they are obligated to arrive back on campus before other students and are not able to spend much time at home around the holiday season.

“It is especially hard for people on the team who don’t have easy access to get home,” said Mike Hogervorst, 21, a senior electrical engineering major and men’s basketball center from Leiden, South Holland, Netherlands. “We are all away from home and not able to spend time with friends and family like the other students on campus.”

Being away from home over the winter break makes it “challenging to spend time with friends from home,” Bertrand agreed. Winter break is the longest break during the academic year.

“The break between semesters is typically about a month long,” Giroux said. “This month-long break occurs for most colleges, making it the easiest time to see friends who are away from home for college as well.”

The break between semesters is “the most neutral break where most of my friends are back in town,” Bertrand said. Because the basketball players are not able to spend much time at home, they find ways to make being on campus feel like they are still on break

“Even though we are on campus for most of our winter break, it does not feel normal because there is no homework to do and no one in the buildings,” Booth said. “This is the only time while in season that we can actually just relax and focus on just basketball.”

Still, staying on campus during winter break does have some downsides as well, according to Giroux. As everything on campus is closed, that makes access to food harder than it normally is when school is in session.

“The chow hall is closed until the Sunday before the first day of the spring semester,” Hogervorst said. “A lot of us rely on the students who live off campus as a place we can go to cook meals.”

Getting food is not as “difficult for those who live locally,” Booth said. The players who live locally are able to get meals and snacks from home and bring it back to campus.

“It is easier to prepare individual meals at home and just bring it back to campus,” Giroux said. “Then all that is left for me to do is reheat my meal in the microwave.”

Multi-sport athletes show they’re game

Norwich University student-athletes face multiple hardships during their time on campus as they try to balance their academic and athletic responsibilities. But some choose an even harder path, participating in two sports in an academic year. Although they admit it can be a struggle, these two-sport players have been able to thrive and succeed despite the pressures of this lifestyle.

A few different athletics programs share athletes with one another, both on the men’s side and the women’s side, although the total number of twosport athletes at Norwich on the women’s programs heavily outweigh those on men’s teams.

Norwich athletics goes through three seasons: a fall season, a winter season, and a spring season. About five to eight different teams are underway per season, and a student-athlete can participate on at least one team each season.

Athletically, a major problem for twosport athletes comes when seasons overlap. Head Norwich women’s volleyball coach Ashlynn Nuckols, who currently coaches two two-sport athletes, noted that “when you cross over seasons, you can tell the difference between (people) when it’s just one sport and two sports at that time.”

Seasons can sometimes overlap for just a few days, or for as long as a month. If a student is playing for a team in the fall season and a team for the winter season, or a team in the winter and a team in the spring, issues may gradually arise.

This overlapping period can result in student-athletes either missing practice for one of those teams, or partaking in two practices a day, one for each team.

“The hardest struggle for me was the transfer over from volleyball to basketball,” said Rebecca Finley, an 18-year old freshman psychology and criminal justice double major who plays women’s basketball and volleyball. “Towards the end of volleyball, it was already three weeks into basketball season. I was doing double practices every day, and trying to keep up with all my school work.”

These student-athletes face a handful of challenges throughout the academic year: their academics are at the forefront, but some are also enrolled in the Corps of Cadets.

“The Corps takes up a lot of my time,” Finley said. “It puts on a lot of added stress on you, especially being a freshman going through rookdom.”

Other students, meanwhile, maintain other responsibilities. Teresa Segreti, a 22-year old senior athletic training major from Salisbury Mills, N.Y., who plays women’s hockey and women’s lacrosse, is also a member of the Vermont Guard.

“It’s definitely challenging trying to make it to every practice or game,” Segreti said. “Between drill weekends, school, and balancing two practice schedules, it’s sometimes hard to pick and choose because I can only be in one place at a time.” Like Finley, Segreti also faces the challenge of doing double practices; women’s hockey runs during the winter season, while women’s lacrosse is held during the spring season.

“A disadvantage is the fatigue. I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t tired,” Segreti said. “Especially on days where I happen to be able to make both lacrosse and hockey practice, and I’m running from one practice to the next.” B o t h coaches and student-athletes have seen an advantage in playing two or more sports in college, however. Firstyear men’s and women’s swimming and diving head coach Jay Schotter said that these athletes “might have ideas of leadership and team morale and how they’ve faced struggles with other teams,” adding that is something he always looks for in these student-athletes.

Nuckols agreed with Schotter, saying that these student-athletes “grew up in these sports, so they understand the team dynamics of each team.”

Another advantage for two-sport athletes is the ability to regularly stay fit and in shape, and, as Schotter pointed out, “they’re able to come in and have the attitude of cross-training.”

“When one season is over, the other starts and they overlap for a month or so,” Segreti agreed“So I’m constantly working different muscle groups and staying conditioned and in shape.”

Ultimately, these student-athletes have shared mixed experiences and results in their time at Norwich University. “I have seen a wide variety. I’ve seen some get overwhelmed, burn out, and quit both sports, while barely maintaining their academic standing,” said Emily Oliver, a 21- year old junior mechanical engineering and pre-med double major from Sagamore Hills, Ohio. “I’ve seen others do extremely well, enjoy their time with their team, and cherish their free time.”

Along with being a double major, Oliver is currently the only three-sport athlete at Norwich University. Oliver was the team captain for the women’s volleyball program this past year, is a starting guard for the women’s basketball team, and is one of the premier pitchers for the softball program.

With being a three-sport athlete, Oliver has undergone some of the same challenges that two-sport athletes have experienced, but to a further extreme. Oliver noted that, although she has been able to form special bonds with three different teams, she may not meet people if they either are not on one of her teams or in one of her classes. Although being a two-sport athlete adds an immense amount of stress onto an already exhausting schedule, those who decide to participate in multiple sports do it for meaningful purposes. “Playing two sports is a choice we make. It would be easy to only play one sport and balance everything, so I believe we have a certain drive and enjoy the challenge,” Segreti said. “I’d like to think we all love athletics and love to compete, so overall our experience is positive.”

Oliver provided key advice to those who play two or more sports, or to those who might be interested in pursuing the hectic lifestyle of a two-sport competitor.

“Prioritize your responsibilities. Academics come before anything, that’s what you’re here to do. Teammates come second, you have a responsibility to them to show up in your fullest form, you spend more time with them than you do with your friends during season,” Oliver said.

Oliver has enjoyed distinct success at Norwich University, despite facing the challenges and hardships of double majoring and extensively playing three different sports. She has been named to the Dean’s List every semester at Norwich.

“Finally, you have a responsibility to yourself,” Oliver said. “Make sure you’re still enjoying what you’re doing, and you have time for yourself.”

World-class female wrestler coaching at NU

When Norwich University hired a new member of the wrestling coaching staff this season, it got someone ranked number two in the country at 63 kilograms.

For Women’s Freestyle Wrestling. That’s right, Norwich’s new wrestling coach is a female, Erin Clodgo, a Richmond, Vt. native, and a Northern Michigan University alum.

She has spent the last 13 years of her life training out of the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Co. Having been a U.S. World Team member since 2007, Clodgo has decided to give coaching a try, and decided to start helping the Norwich University wrestling team.

“It has been awesome having coach Erin around. She really pushes us hard in training, and we’re all pretty dang sore the next day after she comes in. Whenever she says ‘I hope you ate your Wheaties this morning,’ we know it’s going to be a tough day,” said Brendan Desfosses, who wrestles at 157 lbs. and is a 19-year-old sophomore international studies major, from Methuen, Mass.

“Having Erin in the room helping out has been great. Coach Keating has traveled the world competing, and training in Russia, and he has seen a lot of different styles, but not nearly to the same degree as Erin has. She is bringing in a whole new style and background to us,” said Alex Whitney, head wrestling coach for Norwich University.

Assistant coach Connor Keating has spent quite a few years competing at the world level as well, having trained with U.S. and Russian national team members as well as coaches. He comes from a very similar wrestling background as Whitney. They have been teammates in college, thus giving them an extremely similar approach to wrestling, having been under the same coaching staff together.

“Clodgo has had a completely different upbringing in the sport, having been under different coaches. She brings an entirely new set of experiences and approaches to Norwich with her,” Whitney said.

Clodgo bringing in this new set of experiences and backgrounds has been immediately acknowledged and appreciated by the coaches and wrestlers alike.

“Having Coach Erin has been a wonderful learning experience for me. She has helped me open up more as a wrestler, and gave me new ways of hitting certain attacks, that I wasn’t quite getting with either of coaches before,” said Jack Schultz, 157 lbs., a 19-year-old freshman psychology major, from Cedar Grove, N.J. “She helped me a lot with building on my fireman’s carry (a type of leg attack in wrestling), specifically being able to use enough of my opponent’s pressure against him to hit this move quicker and smoother than before.”

Schultz has seen a lot of improvements on the minute details of certain techniques, and attributes this all to Clodgo.

“She is extremely nitpicky about the smallest things, and this has proven to be the difference maker in whether or not I score in my matches,” Schultz said.

Schultz isn’t the only wrestler who appreciates Clodgo’s nitpicking on technique. Senior captain Jonathan Graziane was also subject to Clodgo’s precise teaching on technique.

On Clodgo’s first day helping out the cadets she was training primarily with Graziane. “I had no idea who she was, why she was here, or any of her accolades. I was just told to wrestle with her,” said Jonathan Graziane, who wrestles at 141 lbs. and is a senior and captain. “I didn’t know she was going to be a coach, nobody introduced her, coach Whitney just brought her in to bang heads with us and teach us a little lesson in wrestling,” said Graziane, 22, an environmental science major, from Plattsburg, N.Y.

“Not even five minutes into wrestling with her, she had already corrected my form on my double legs drastically.”

Clodgo has helped build on technique at a rapid pace, according to Whitney. “Normally when we teach a technique, it will take months to see that technique used in a match. I don’t know why, but that has been the way it is in all my years coaching. With coach Erin it has been different. Guys are making these changes in their arsenal a lot more rapidly,” Whitney said.

Graziane and Schultz are just two of quite a few examples of the wrestlers making these quick alterations in adapting their many moves.

“Since coach Erin came in and started helping us, I started attacking more in matches. At the Roger Williams Invitational tournament, I was down by six points in my second match. It was the third and final period, and I needed to push the tempo of the match. What I was trying earlier in the match wasn’t working, so I said screw it,” Graziane said. “I hit two double legs and that lead to me getting back points and I ended up winning the match.”

Graziane attributed that win to Clodgo helping him gain confidence in his double leg takedowns. “My cardio was there well before coach Erin came along. My mental toughness grew through having coach Whitney and coach Keating, but as far as technique goes, I wouldn’t have gone for that specific move before coach Erin came and helped me,” Graziane said.

PJ Testino, a 141 lb wrestler and 20-yearold junior in construction management major from Dingmans Ferry, Pa., Clodgo’s coaching style is an “intensified variation on coach Keating’s style,” Testino said. “Coach Keating is pretty intense and I kind of see coach Whitney as the more laid-back coach, but now it’s like coach K is the happy middle for us.”

“Like coach Keating, she is hard-nosed in her approach. She is fast-paced, and really pushes us harder than we’’e been pushed before. It’s awesome having somebody as decorated as her in here with us day in and day out,” said Testino.

Calling Clodgo a highly decorated wrestler is an understatement. “In 2007 she joined the U.S. Junior World team, and in ‘08, she placed third in the world team trials. In ‘09 alone she took second in the Sunkist Kids International Open, Third in the U.S. World Team Trials, and sixth in the U.S. Nationals,” Whitney said.

“In 2010, she took third in the Hargobind International, second in the Sunkist Kids International Open, third in the Canada Cup, second in the U.S. World Team Trials, and was the U.S. Open champion. That was just in 2010,” Whitney said. “In 2011 she took second in the Pan American Championships, second in the U.S. Open, fourth at the Dave Schultz Memorial International. I can keep going on and on.”

On and on Whitney went. “In 2012, she was second in the U.S. World Team Wrestle-Off, second in the Hari Ram Grand Prix in India, third in the Klippan Lady Open in Sweden, third in the Dave Schultz Memorial International, third in the Ivan Yarygin Memorial in Russia, and third in the U.S. Open. I’ll just skip forward to 2016 and on,” Whitney said. “In 2016, she took fifth in the Open Cup in Russia, second in the U.S. Olympic Team Trials, she won the Pan American Olympic Games Qualifier, placed third in the Olympic Test Event in Brazil, and took third in the U.S. Open,” Whitney continued.

In this year alone Clodgo also “won the U.S. Open, and on Nov. 2, 2017, had won the Dave Schultz Memorial International tournament.” Whitney finished up with this: “When USA Wrestling was interviewing her, she had even said she’s been going up to Norwich University in Vermont and helping coach there and wrestling there. It has been an honor to work with them and for me to read that was an amazing thing to hear.”

Clodgo winning the Dave Schultz Memorial International tournament was big news not only for the U.S. women’s national team, and for Clodgo herself, but big news for Norwich as well. Clodgo training with and helping coach Norwich’s team brings on the plethora of experiences she has had, from herself, and the learning experiences from every match. Norwich wrestlers are now able to further their own knowledge through training with Clodgo, and this is hoped to help grow the wrestling program.

It is also very new to the sport of wrestling having a female coach, on the men’s wrestling team. For every wrestler interviewed, only one wrestler has ever experienced a female coach.

Schultz, the New Jersey native, has never had a female coach, but quite a few programs in his area whom he competed against had female coaches.

“I never had a female coach, but in New Jersey there were also enough women in wrestling to constitute having women’s wrestling teams,” Schultz said. “These women’s wrestling teams usually had at least one female coach.”

Whitney has seen females in the wrestling world more often as the sport of wrestling continues to grow. “Coach Keating and myself were down in Florida for the National Wrestling Coaches Association convention in August, and there were a good number of female coaches there. There were definitely more women there than in the past. There were roughly ten female coaches there of the hundreds of coaches in attendance,” Whitney said.

“In this day in wrestling, women’s wrestling is becoming an emerging and growing sport, and it actually just became a Division I sport,” Whitney elaborated.

What is next for Clodgo, and Norwich wrestling? “I really hope she stays around for the long run,” Desfosses said.

Clodgo, while still competing, will still be helping out with coaching and for Norwich, this means having an extremely accomplished World Team member in the wrestling room helping shape the Norwich wrestling program.

Opinion: A corps cadre member speaks out

I am cadre in one of the rook battalions at Norwich University. For the sake of protecting myself from possible reprimand or retaliation, I will not provide my name, rank, unit, or building. For the sake of maintaining a level of professionalism, I will also not give the names of recruits, cadre, or commandants in this statement.

As a cadre member, I arrived at school two weeks prior to Rook Orientation Week and underwent various trainings under the supervision of my Corps leadership as well as the commandants in order to ensure that my peers as well as myself, were proficient and knowledgeable in conducting the tasks required of cadre during Rookdom. This training consisted of your run-of-the-mill expected instruction: drill and ceremony, PRT’s, etc. Along with this training, we were also given numerous briefings regarding Title IX, legalities, professionalism, etc. Hiccups during training were minimal and were quickly addressed and the quality of leaders present, ready to fulfill the duties of cadre were impeccable based upon my own observations and based on what was said by the commandants overseeing our training as a whole. We started off the year firmly believing that things would run smoothly, aside from the usual initial issues with Rook training, and believing that the commandants had a level of faith in us and backed us entirely. We are only a few weeks into the academic year and this has proved to not be the case whatsoever. [Read more…]

Norwich radio station WNUB will celebrate 50 years on air this December

Students do a show at Norwich’s radio station WNUB, which will celebrate its 50th anniversary this December.                                                                                                      Evan Bowley Photo

WNUB has clearly been able to stand the test of time as Dec. 8, 2017, marks its 50th anniversary at Norwich University. A celebration of its 50 years will take place on the 8th in the Mill located in the Wise Campus Center.

Professor Doug Smith has been the manager of the station since 1999, and teaches classes that teach students the fundamentals of running a radio station, as well as how to run their own show.

“The experience is really good for them in terms of understanding how radio stations and radio broadcasting really works,” said Smith.

While the station itself is located on the second floor of the communications building, the signal actually broadcasts from an antenna atop Jackman Hall. The station features three studios: One is for on air entertainment, and the other two are used for production and editing.

WNUB was founded in 1967 by a group of engineering students. Up until the classes to teach broadcasting techniques were offered, the station was entirely student run as a club.

Smith is organizing the anniversary event.

“We’re having a big celebration in the Mill on Dec. 8th, counting down the top songs from the past 50 years, along with contests, prizes and giveaways,” said Smith. [Read more…]

Fall Army ROTC FTX deemed a success

Major Ethan Orr, at left, instructs Army ROTC cadets on FTX.                          Jon Wriston Photo

As we draw close to Thanksgiving break, Norwich’s Army ROTC cadets can relax a little more with their fall FTX (Field Training Exercise) out of the way for the semester.

“It’s the first time that all the Military Science (MS) groups come together,” said Sgt. Maj. Sherwood Gatz, the senior military instructor for Army ROTC.

For the MSIVs (Senior Army cadets) it is the pivotal point of their time in ROTC. Planning a training event tests their preparedness and problem-solving as future junior officers.

The MSIVs in the battalion staff are assigned a role “just like a regular Army unit,” Gatz said. They are the backbone of the planning process and in the student leadership of the lower MS levels.

“We make sure their information is correct and logistics and supplies is locked in tight before they actually give out how the FTX is going to go,” Gatz explained.

The Army staff are careful not to interfere too much with the cadets as they want them to learn from their mistakes.

“I’ll only chime in when it’s really going off the intended path,” said Staff Sgt. Thomas Walker, an MS1 instructor for Army ROTC.

The MSIV cadets begin their FTX planning as early as April. This gives them time to learn their staff duties as well as consolidate lessons learned and goals for the training they’ll be responsible for.

“Our planning began as early as last semester,” said Charles Dodos, a 21-year old senior studies in war and peace major, from Worcester, Mass. [Read more…]

Campus spooks? Some find Norwich a haunting experience

Alumni Hall leads the list of spooky stories on the Norwich campus. It’s got a lot of history inside, and maybe a ghost or two. Photo by Adam Ganz

At Norwich University, Halloween doesn’t just occur in October, but rather all year long. On a campus with 200 years of history, you’re bound to experience something haunting, whether it be rumors passed down from older students or a spooky personal experience.

Perhaps the most notorious locale for haunting stories is Alumni Hall, the oldest building on campus, built in 1905. In March of 2012, The Norwich Record featured a story titled “Spirits Among Us,” which outlined the terrible story of two cadets, brothers, who hung themselves in the same room a year apart.

“The hangings were viewed as tragic but unrelated coincidences until one fateful day, when a cadet walked into the same basement room and saw his buddy standing on a chair getting ready to hang himself,” wrote The Norwich Record. When asked “why?” “the cadet then explained that the woebegone victims had each appeared in the mirror, coaxing him to join them.”

The room was then sealed off by bricks, according to rumor, and is used as the building’s facilities room. However, when the wall is knocked on, there is a hollow sound where a door once was and there are countless stories of unsettling noises and events stemming from Alumni Hall to this day. [Read more…]

Corps of Cadets faces internal issues

Training rooks takes every level of leadership relying on each other to make the best decisions. Cadre and commandants work together to take care of recruits and to train them. But sometimes even the trainers have to pause to mend internal issues.

That’s been the case with meetings during the fall semester of 2017-2018 in order to fix concerns with communication and trust issues between the cadre and commandants.

The training of first-year cadets, known as recruits or rooks, takes place in two battalions. These battalions consist of three companies, which each consist of three platoons, the place where recruits are trained by cadre.

Each battalion has an AC (assistant commandant), a SEA (senior enlisted advisor), and a TAC NCO (tactical NCO). The commandants help facilitate training through the cadre, enforce disciplinary measures, as well as mentor and aid cadre in their leadership of recruits. [Read more…]

Semper Fi Society holds annual Walter N. Levy challenge

On the first of October, Norwich University’s campus was full of action as students and locals alike participated in the Walter N. Levy Challenge, a motivating and inspiring experience for those who do it or help out.
“For me, who has always volunteered, and never actually ran the course, I still get a lot out of it,” said Chandler Heath, a 21-year-old business management major from Atlanta, Ga. “I think it’s especially great for the Naval Battalion to help out, and instead of doing something for ourselves, actually volunteer and contribute towards something greater than ourselves.”
The Levy Challenge is a 10k endurance race “that will challenge you mentally and physically” according to the page on Active.com. The event includes obstacles such as: The Marine Corps obstacle course, steep grade of Hill 488, Quang Nam mud crawl, Rock Pile ammo resupply mission, pull-up challenge, Hue City ruck run, and the Da Nang serpentine.
This October marked the race’s eighth consecutive year memorializing Walter N. Levy, who graduated Norwich in 1963, and then commissioned and served in the Marine Corps as a Second Lieutenant Infantry Officer until he was killed in action on Sept. 18, 1965 in South Vietnam.
The Marine Corps branch of ROTC on Norwich’s campus has been organizing the event since its origination. “I think the organization was fine this year, Semper Fi always does a really good job of covering their bases, and making sure all the fine details of event organization are sorted out,” said Heath.
Also helping out with the event for its eight years has been Norwich’s Naval Battalion. Semper Fi handles the logistics including registration of racers, planning and finalizing a route, food for the racers after they finish, and the keeping of the contestant’s time. On the other side of things, Naval Battalion is there to man all the different stations, and “add to the body of volunteers as to ensure a smooth operation.” said Heath. [Read more…]

Players rave about basketball court upgrade

During the past summer, Andrews Hall saw its first renovation to the basketball court in over 25 years.

“Coming back to campus after summer break and seeing the new basketball court was surreal,” said Tommy Fitzgerald, 21, a senior guard on the basketball team from Williston, Vt. “While we were home and away from campus, we could only look at pictures of the new court but after seeing it in person, it truly is amazing.”

With the previous basketball court being broken down due to the wear and tear of a multiple seasons of play, the school had to refinish the floor every summer to keep up with the maintenance for the players. The stateof-the-art new court now features the same hard maple flooring found in National Basketball Association (NBA) arenas around the country – a surface somewhat rare in smaller schools within the NCAA.

“I think the company did a really excellent job resurfacing the new court,” said head basketball coach Paul Booth, who hails from Northfield. “There is a lot more grip to the court along with it being a more solid surface than it was prior to this (renovation).”

Maple hardwood flooring is by far the most expensive option to outfit a basketball arena. On average, hardwood costs about 20 percent more than PVC and about 40 percent more than poured urethane. The renovation of the basketball court this past summer was funded with money from the capital projects budget, as a small part of the $100 million dollar plan the university has to improve a multitude of on-campus buildings. [Read more…]