Norwich radio station WNUB will celebrate 50 years on air this December

Students do a show at Norwich’s radio station WNUB, which will celebrate its 50th anniversary this December.                                                                                                      Evan Bowley Photo

WNUB has clearly been able to stand the test of time as Dec. 8, 2017, marks its 50th anniversary at Norwich University. A celebration of its 50 years will take place on the 8th in the Mill located in the Wise Campus Center.

Professor Doug Smith has been the manager of the station since 1999, and teaches classes that teach students the fundamentals of running a radio station, as well as how to run their own show.

“The experience is really good for them in terms of understanding how radio stations and radio broadcasting really works,” said Smith.

While the station itself is located on the second floor of the communications building, the signal actually broadcasts from an antenna atop Jackman Hall. The station features three studios: One is for on air entertainment, and the other two are used for production and editing.

WNUB was founded in 1967 by a group of engineering students. Up until the classes to teach broadcasting techniques were offered, the station was entirely student run as a club.

Smith is organizing the anniversary event.

“We’re having a big celebration in the Mill on Dec. 8th, counting down the top songs from the past 50 years, along with contests, prizes and giveaways,” said Smith. [Read more…]

Campus spooks? Some find Norwich a haunting experience

Alumni Hall leads the list of spooky stories on the Norwich campus. It’s got a lot of history inside, and maybe a ghost or two. Photo by Adam Ganz

At Norwich University, Halloween doesn’t just occur in October, but rather all year long. On a campus with 200 years of history, you’re bound to experience something haunting, whether it be rumors passed down from older students or a spooky personal experience.

Perhaps the most notorious locale for haunting stories is Alumni Hall, the oldest building on campus, built in 1905. In March of 2012, The Norwich Record featured a story titled “Spirits Among Us,” which outlined the terrible story of two cadets, brothers, who hung themselves in the same room a year apart.

“The hangings were viewed as tragic but unrelated coincidences until one fateful day, when a cadet walked into the same basement room and saw his buddy standing on a chair getting ready to hang himself,” wrote The Norwich Record. When asked “why?” “the cadet then explained that the woebegone victims had each appeared in the mirror, coaxing him to join them.”

The room was then sealed off by bricks, according to rumor, and is used as the building’s facilities room. However, when the wall is knocked on, there is a hollow sound where a door once was and there are countless stories of unsettling noises and events stemming from Alumni Hall to this day. [Read more…]

Corps of Cadets faces internal issues

Training rooks takes every level of leadership relying on each other to make the best decisions. Cadre and commandants work together to take care of recruits and to train them. But sometimes even the trainers have to pause to mend internal issues.

That’s been the case with meetings during the fall semester of 2017-2018 in order to fix concerns with communication and trust issues between the cadre and commandants.

The training of first-year cadets, known as recruits or rooks, takes place in two battalions. These battalions consist of three companies, which each consist of three platoons, the place where recruits are trained by cadre.

Each battalion has an AC (assistant commandant), a SEA (senior enlisted advisor), and a TAC NCO (tactical NCO). The commandants help facilitate training through the cadre, enforce disciplinary measures, as well as mentor and aid cadre in their leadership of recruits. [Read more…]

Semper Fi Society holds annual Walter N. Levy challenge

On the first of October, Norwich University’s campus was full of action as students and locals alike participated in the Walter N. Levy Challenge, a motivating and inspiring experience for those who do it or help out.
“For me, who has always volunteered, and never actually ran the course, I still get a lot out of it,” said Chandler Heath, a 21-year-old business management major from Atlanta, Ga. “I think it’s especially great for the Naval Battalion to help out, and instead of doing something for ourselves, actually volunteer and contribute towards something greater than ourselves.”
The Levy Challenge is a 10k endurance race “that will challenge you mentally and physically” according to the page on Active.com. The event includes obstacles such as: The Marine Corps obstacle course, steep grade of Hill 488, Quang Nam mud crawl, Rock Pile ammo resupply mission, pull-up challenge, Hue City ruck run, and the Da Nang serpentine.
This October marked the race’s eighth consecutive year memorializing Walter N. Levy, who graduated Norwich in 1963, and then commissioned and served in the Marine Corps as a Second Lieutenant Infantry Officer until he was killed in action on Sept. 18, 1965 in South Vietnam.
The Marine Corps branch of ROTC on Norwich’s campus has been organizing the event since its origination. “I think the organization was fine this year, Semper Fi always does a really good job of covering their bases, and making sure all the fine details of event organization are sorted out,” said Heath.
Also helping out with the event for its eight years has been Norwich’s Naval Battalion. Semper Fi handles the logistics including registration of racers, planning and finalizing a route, food for the racers after they finish, and the keeping of the contestant’s time. On the other side of things, Naval Battalion is there to man all the different stations, and “add to the body of volunteers as to ensure a smooth operation.” said Heath. [Read more…]

Pegasus players get a new theater director

Jeffry Casey, the new director of the Pegasus Players

Jeff Casey looked around at his new office in the basement of Webb. There were lights and props from Dole Auditorium strewn about.

The native Texan had just started this year as assistant professor of theater in the department of English and communications.

There were no windows in his office, surrounded by cold concrete walls, but it certainly looked as if he had made a home for himself.

Fresh from getting his Ph.D. and finishing work from the University of Wisconsin-Madison he had finally got settled at Norwich.

“You don’t need to justify doing theater,” Casey said. “No one cares, everyone just wants to do it, it’s fun.” [Read more…]

NU wi-fi upgraded yet some problems persist

Norwich University has invested a lot of time and more than $5 million dollars into upgrading the campus’ Wi-Fi network, but students still face some issues regarding the network’s strength and coverage capabilities.

Since this summer, Norwich has been working on a major network upgrade, with the purpose of improving the quality of Wi-Fi connection on campus, according to the members of the Information Technology Department (IT).

“Thanks to this project, more than 650 access points have been upgraded across campus,” said Frank Moore, the chief information officer at Norwich. An access point (AP) is a hardware device that allows wireless devices to connect to the network. By increasing the number of APs, and by improving the distribution, more users can get on a single access point without degrading the service and slowing it down.

According to the IT department staff, in order to keep current with the ever-growing demand for network service, the university favored supporting the network via an operational lease, which allows for renewal of innovation and technological transformation, at the end and beginning of each lease term.

“The university is going through a major network refresh,” explained the Director of User Services & University Outreach at Norwich, Joseph Morvan. “Part of that refresh was recalibrating our wireless environment.” Thanks to this project, previous complaints about the slowness of the WiFi, and the interruption of the connection, will be soon solved, he said.

The main priorities are the residence halls and the barracks, due to the high density and constant use of the connection by students. [Read more…]

Corps housing crunch causes some concerns

For the 2017 fall semester at Norwich University, almost 40 upperclass Corps of Cadets were assigned to live in lounges and classrooms instead of traditional barracks or dorms, according to student housing and admissions.

Typically, Corps students live in barracks that are located on the upper parade ground, which is commonly referred to as “the UP.” These barracks are separated from the civilian dorms.

Major Justin LeFebvre, the NUCC commandant adjutant, makes the decisions for where the Corps students will live. He has been working at Norwich University for 15 years, however, this is his first year being in charge of the housing office. He has had his “eyes opened” and is aware of the many “challenges” that housing entails.

According to LeFebvre, there were multiple reasons as to why certain cadets were assigned to live in a classroom or lounge. If a student didn’t “complete housing forms, tell housing they were coming back, or were readmitted at the last moment,” there was no reserved space for them.

“If I don’t know they are coming back I can’t give them a bed on the UP,” LeFebvre said. [Read more…]

For foreign student-athletes, there are many challenges to overcome

International student-athletes at Norwich University encounter hardships with finances, fitting in, and leaving home, according to N.U. coaches and athletes.

Attending college at Norwich is a “big time and financial commitment for the international student-athletes,” said Adam Pfeifer, Norwich’s head men’s soccer coach. However according to foreign students interviewed, the end product will be worth the all the financial, emotional, and lifestyle changes they are overcoming.

International student-athletes enrolling at Norwich is an increasingly popular trend during the past decade, according to NU coaches. Interviews offer a perspective on the challenges such athletes face and how they overcome them – and also how coaches are trying to adapt to their presence.

“In my 25 years here, having an international student has not occurred very often,” said Paul Booth, Norwich University’s head men’s basketball coach. “Over the last four or five years, we have had several kids that have enrolled from other destinations besides the United States.”
[Read more…]

A military rivalry is reborn at Sabine Field

Players line up and get ready to play for Norwich University vs. US Coast Guard Academy.
Photo by Darwin Carozza

The renewal of a historic rivalry with Coast Guard did not go the way Norwich football hoped, but the team was excited to play another military school. They are already looking forward to revenge next year, players said. The “Little Army-Navy” game “will always be a game we look forward to as they are one of our biggest rivals, and losing to them is hard to take,” said sophomore defensive lineman Ferron Greene.

Leading up to the game, Norwich (0-3) had lost to Castleton in the previous week by a score of 28-14, in the annual Maple Sap Bucket rivalry game. This game however showcased Matthew Chaffee, sophomore quarterback, who saw his first collegiate career action late in the third quarter, where he put up two touchdowns and recorded 148 yards passing. Prior to the “Little Army-Navy” game, Coast Guard (2-1) was coming off a 13-0 shutout win over Nichols College, where its defense only let up 123 yards of total offense, and recorded four interceptions. Coast Guard’s quarterback was off to a quick start this season, passing for 753 yards and four touchdowns.

Norwich has seen some tough opponents early in their season and has had some difficulty overcoming these challenges after a number of key injuries, but were able to build up momentum leading up to the game as they put the previous three games behind them. The excitement was in the air throughout the whole week leading up to the big game. Practices were long and hard, players were determined, and the students’ energy was through the roof.
[Read more…]

Norwich remembers 9/11