Archives for March 2014

That’s What She Said…

‘Honor’ and ‘integrity’ are probably two of the most important and common words you hear on campus aside from “I will try” or “Norwich” and “Forever”.

Being the military brat I am, I moved in the middle of my sophomore year in high school, from outside of Ft. Benning, Ga. to just outside of Seattle, Wa. Back in the day, I was very involved in the Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) and transferred to the local Navy unit. The culture shock from my military base on the east coast to the west coast was challenging with regard to the level of patriotism and military support. But, I was also quite taken aback by how honest and morally grounded the cadets were for high school students.

“Integritas,” my new commander would greet us with a fist pounded against his chest. I did not understand what he meant, until he told me a tale of the Roman soldiers making the same tight-fisted gesture against their armor as they yelled the Latin root word for our word “integrity.”

The word means “whole” and that their armor was not broken. It was strong and honorable, like the soldier himself. They were mighty warriors who serve as the renowned models for many militaries to this day. As NU cadets, we live by their code today with our “Integritas” keeping our armor of education and moral aptitude strong. Like the Romans, our integrity keeps us whole as Cadets and as we look to the future.

“Integritas!”

Arielle Eaton, Editor-in-Chief, The Guidon

As seniors head toward graduation, student loan repayment looms as worry

 

Student loan debt continues to pile up on America’s college graduates, according to a recent CNN article, which states that the average college graduate leaves school with $29,000 dollars worth of student loans (www.cnnmoney.com).

Although Norwich University has a fair share of students under full or part scholarships from various branches of the military, most seniors are worried about their debt and future job market opportunities. [Read more…]

Cadet Sgt. Maj. Coston reflects on dismissal, defends approach to improving Corps

Command. Sgt. Maj. Matthew Coston delivering his speech during Recognition.

Command Sgt. Maj. Matthew Coston delivering his speech during Recognition.

Since freshman year, Matthew Coston wanted to be the cadet regimental command sergeant major in Norwich University’s Corps of Cadets. As a senior this year, he applied for the job and got it.

“It was an awesome experience,” said the 21-year-old criminal justice major from Boston, Mass.

It also ended unexpectedly with his dismissal Feb. 3, an unusual event in the Corps of Cadets. In an interview, Coston reflected on his situation and defended his approach to improving the Corps and his passion for the job. [Read more…]

Regan Steen chosen to head Norwich University regiment

Regan Steen is the new Cadet Colonel for the 2014-2015 school year. She will head the Norwich University Corps of Cadets.

Regan Steen is the new Cadet Colonel for the 2014-2015 school year. She will head the Norwich University Corps of Cadets.

Home schooled until high school and raised on the outskirts of Detroit, Regan Steen would have never guessed three years ago she would be in charge of the entire regiment of cadets at the oldest private senior military college in the country.

But during the course of three years, Steen, a contracted Army ROTC four-year scholarship recipient, has earned various awards, accomplishments, certifications, and observations that have left her with a vision for the future of the corps. [Read more…]

Dodgeball delivers, for a cause

From PE class to the big screen, dodgeball is a popular sport that brings in crowds.

Norwich University’s physical education class made the decision to plan a dodgeball tournament to raise money for the American Heart Association. The event took place on March 2nd on campus, in the Shapiro Fieldhouse.

According to organizers, the tournament not only was fun but raised $260 for the association and offered an educational experience.

“(The tournament) gives our physical education class, Organization & Management of Physical Education and Athletic Programs, an opportunity to plan and facilitate a fundraising event,” said Tom Roberge, a physical education professor. “It also raises money for a good cause, as everyone has been affected or will be affected by heart disease.”

Roberge explained that in past years they did a “Hoops for Heart” fundraiser to earn the money. After learning that Norwich is “one of only two colleges and universities in the east region that does an American Heart Association fundraising event,” this made him want to continue fundraising, this time with a new event.

“Hoops for Heart wasn’t as exciting as dodgeball,” said Chelsea Weeden, a senior athletic training major from Colchester, Vt. “More college students get way more excited playing in a dodgeball tournament versus a basketball tournament. Plus you can play dodgeball anywhere.”

For those not familiar with it, dodgeball is a sport that pits teams of opposing players throwing balls at one another. It’s a contest of elimination: The last player to avoid being hit is the winner.

Weeden, a student of the PE class that is hosting the event, was excited to be hosting the event, not only for the money it could raise, but also for the fun her fellow student body could have participating.

“There are two winning teams. One will be for the actual tournament and the other will be a contest for the best team costumes.”

Costumes will be similar to the ones from the comedy Dodgeball, starring comedy actor Vince Vaughn, but the options could be less comical and more theatrical, such as a team dressed as characters from the movie The Avengers.

“The class then thought a change of scenery may attract more people. Last year many of the teams dressed in costume, some emulating the teams from the movie, Dodgeball,” Roberge said.

The prizes are not half bad either, Roberge said. “So far we have some great prizes for the winners that include movie tickets, gift certificates to the UMall and pizzas from Depot Square.”

As for the technical side of this event, according to Roberge, a referee was on site during each game to make sure the games are fair. “While staying on your team’s half of the court you try and hit people on the other team with the dodgeballs. If you get hit you go out. If you catch the ball thrown at you, the thrower is out and you can bring a teammate back in the game. First team to knock out the other team’s five players wins. I believe our class has decided to allow head shots this year.”

The rules of dodgeball vary in different settings, but they have been around for centuries.

According to “Go Mammoth,” an English sports web site, dodgeball was originally played in Africa over 200 years ago. However, instead of the fun game it is today, dodgeball could be a game of death. Instead of using soft rubber balls, the game was played with large rocks or putrefied matter, and it was also used as an intense workout for the tribes.

The games at this event were not be played with rocks, of course. Roberge explained that they used the “old-school, rubber kick balls.” The weight distribution will be much better than using the foam-filled balls often used in elementary school gym classes.

There are great health benefits to dodgeball; according to Livestrong.com, players get aerobic exercise from the running, and work on agility and balance and hand-eye coordination. Those perks alone were enough to draw students looking to be in shape for spring and have a good time doing it, out on the court.

As for the crowd’s entertainment, Bruce Mackey, 23, a junior physical education major from West Point, Ga., did the announcing for the event. An animated football player, he is well known for his ability to imitate voices and make the play by plays of the game hilarious.

With teams of five, paying $25 a team is not a huge price to put on fun: “One hundred percent of the money will go to the American Heart Association,” Weeden said.

Having raised $260, Weeden and the rest of the class proved that fundraising can be both successful and fun.

Updated Norwich strategic plan set new goals, improvements for 2019

West Hall, a new dorm for civilian students, is expected to be completed by the fall semester of 2014. The 2019 university plan calls for most students of both lifestyles to live on campus in dorm housing.

West Hall, a new dorm for civilian students, is expected to be completed by the fall semester of 2014. The new                       2019 university plan calls for most students of both lifestyles to live on campus in dorm housing.

Wide-eyed freshmen students land on the Norwich University campus every August when the leaves start to change colors. Upon their arrival, they obtain many important papers, one of which is pocket-sized with the guiding values on one side and the vision statement, mission statement, and the five NU institutional priorities on the other.

Those statements, values, and priorities are what are fueling the goals of the NU 2019 Strategic Plan, which was created by staff of the university in order to better the future of students, faculty, and staff alike. [Read more…]

Women’s hoops team has a breakout season

Aliah Curry, in white, broke the all-time scoring record though she is only a junior. The Lady Cadets had a great run, making to the GNAC finals and ended the year 15-13 with wins in the quarterfinals and semifinals before losing to St. Josephs for the title.

Aliah Curry, in white, broke the all-time scoring record though she is only a junior. The Lady Cadets had a great run, making to the GNAC finals and ended the year 15-13 with wins in the quarterfinals and semifinals before losing to St. Josephs for the title.

The Norwich University Women’s basketball team had a remarkable season, showing great improvement from the 2012-2013 campaign.

This year’s team captains are senior guard Kristin Brown, from Williamstown, Vt., and junior guard Aliah Curry from Windsor, Mass. The two have led the Cadets to the GNAC (Great Northeast Athletic Conference) Finals.

Kelsey Lotti, a junior guard from South Yarmouth, Mass., said goals were set high, and from the start of the season the team’s aim was to win the GNAC. “I had a lot of high expectations for this year’s team. We came into the season with a very strong core of upperclassman from last year and an extremely solid freshman class to accompany us. With this I had my eyes set on one goal, winning the GNAC. We have everything it takes to be the Number One team in our conference,” said Lotti. [Read more…]

Overcoming odds, injured hockey player Liz Gemmiti returns to the ice

As her skate touched the ice, she anticipated hearing the familiar sound of her blade slicing through the frozen surface. She took a lap around the rink, cautious not to fall.

Liz Gemmiti had been told one month before her February comeback that her competitive hockey career was over, after being struck by a car Dec. 14 while walking home with her roommate and teammate Madison Gallagher.

However, by February she was doing laps around the Kreitzberg Arena preparing for her debut at the Norwich Women’s Hockey’s (NUWH) team’s senior game, a game she hoped to be playing in, but would be recognized alongside the other seniors regardless. [Read more…]

In chow hall, a tradition of students guarding their turf

Students dine at the “football table” in the chow hall in the Wise Center. A number of tables are subject to unwritten rules about who eats where – mostly without conflict.

Students dine at the “football table” in the chow hall in the Wise Center. A number of tables are subject to unwritten rules about who eats where – mostly without conflict.

It is not uncommon for friends to share meals together, particularly when they are on-campus students. However, when certain factions claim their table, outsiders can be intimidated while navigating the unwritten seating chart.

The Wise Campus Center Dining Hall at Norwich University maintains an uncharted map of its own that students learn by watching.

Students in the dining hall have a tendency to sit at the exact same tables for every meal. Certain athletic teams, especially, are known for “claiming” their own tables. [Read more…]

That’s what she said…

Often times here at The Guidon, we are asked (and ask of ourselves) what is “the student voice”? It is a term I hear even when it is not directly spoken. Regardless, it is said in daily conversations in the Chow Hall. It is written in the SGA’s legislation. It is whispered in the library and blared out during the UP 500. It is sung during Karaoke Night and danced to at Junior Ring Ball. All of those voices, conversations, movements, and songs contribute to “the student voice.” [Read more…]